Trap laws

Trap laws

0515

Life is not fair. When things go awry, the legal mechanisms that are designed to ensure a normal, comfortable existence, ultimately, drive us to the grave. When this happens, life is like a nightmare.

1. A centuries-old law that squeezes money out of the population

In 1982, Adrian and Gale Walbank of Great Britain became the owners of a farm in Aston Cantlow, which previously belonged to the late father Gale. According to the centuries-old law, known as the obligation to finance the repair of the local church (English chancel repair liability), they now had to deduct money for the maintenance of the local Baptist Church of St. John the Forerunner. In 1990, representatives of this house of worship brought them a bill for repairs in the amount of 96,000 pounds sterling. This was followed by a trial that lasted as much as eighteen years.

Despite their perseverance, Walbank lost the case and had to pay the church 480,000 pounds sterling for repairs and legal fees. The couple had to sell the farm to pay a huge debt.

To understand the cause of the unimaginable sufferings of Walbank, we should go back 500 years, in the time of Henry VIII. When, in the 1530s, Henry VIII began to abolish monasteries and churches, and also to sell the land plots belonging to them, the obligation to finance them fell on the shoulders of new landowners. In the XX century, this system began to be considered nothing more than a relic of the past. However, when the needs for repairing some churches began to approach one billion pounds, the Anglican churches saw in the old law their financial savior.

The Walbank affair attracted the attention of the public, the media and the British Parliament. In an attempt to pre-empt the rampant billing of any unsuspecting parishioners, the government decided to the Anglican churches before the beginning of 2013 to make all claims regarding the allocation of funds for repairs. However, the vague wording of the order invalidated the deadline for its implementation, which caused anxiety and discontent among many parishioners.

2. Recovery of non-existent fees

In 2012 - five years afterhow a financial fire broke out in the real estate market in the United States of America that spread to the global economy - many homeowners were threatened with bankruptcy due to the increased number of people who were denied their right to buy out mortgaged property. A completely unnecessary burden fell on the shoulders of at least 126 unfortunate residents of Colorado. Besides the fact that they were forced to pay hundreds or thousands of dollars in order not to lose the right to redeem the mortgaged property, they were also obliged to cover the fictional legal costs.

No, these Colorado residents did not become the hapless victims of scammers sending fake notifications on behalf of the authorities. The letters they received were real; they dealt with various costs associated with litigation in cases of deprivation of rights to repurchase pledged property. If homeowners pay all necessary fees, they no longer need to worry about being deprived of their right to redeem the mortgaged property. But here's the catch. As participants in this process, lawyers may claim financial compensation for filing a lawsuit about depriving a person of the right to redemptionmortgaged property (by the way, to sell a house, you must first get permission from a judge) on behalf of mortgage lenders. Most of them simply lie about filing these lawsuits in order to pocket money that they have not earned.

This deception was made possible by the laws of the State of Colorado, which remove from public trustees the responsibility for verifying the list of costs associated with litigation in cases of deprivation of rights to repurchase mortgaged property. In 2012, dishonest lawyers earned about $ 40,000 on fictitious application fees.

In 2014, the state of Colorado passed a law that put an end to this legal trick.

3. A typo in the criminal code that cost the girl a good life

Jennifer Riddle’s legal problems began about two decades ago when she contacted a bad company and started using drugs. At the age of 23, she was arrested for possessing a small amount of marijuana. On the advice of her lawyer, Riddle pleaded guilty, paid a fine of $ 250, and, even without appearing at the trial, went further in life.Then no one noticed that the documents in the case of Riddle had been mistaken in the code of the criminal offense committed by the girl. It turned out that she was not accused of possession of marijuana, of which she pleaded guilty, but of a more serious crime - the distribution of a precursor for the manufacture of methamphetamine.

After the trial in the life of Jennifer Riddle, a solid black line began: the girl could not get a job, she was constantly denied when she tried to find housing, and so on. All this time, Riddle did not even know why she was unlucky. And the reason was simple: everyone thought she was lying about her criminal record. Riddle finally realized what was the matter, only when she was sent a letter of refusal to accept a job because she "distorted her criminal past." The girl decided to free herself from a false criminal charge and asked for help in court. Unfortunately, the judge agreed to revoke her guilty plea, but not the accusation of distributing a precursor for making methamphetamine itself.

To dismiss the charges of a crime she did not commit, Jennifer Riddle had to prove that she was convicted falsely, but this had no effect on the situation.In order not to fall behind bars, Riddle agreed to a fake accusation, which, of course, spoiled her life prospects.

4. A man who was mistakenly sentenced to a longer term of imprisonment.

In 2008, Gordon Lee Miller was convicted of illegal possession of firearms in accordance with federal law, which does not allow weapons to criminals convicted of felony. Miller was sentenced to six years in prison and thirty-six months in prison under surveillance after his release, but he was convicted by mistake. The cause of the problem was the difference in how federal and state law in North Carolina determined the status of felonious offenders.

According to federal law, a person convicted of a crime is considered the subject of a felony, which provides for a sentence of more than one year. However, North Carolina law states that prison sentences are partly dependent on how much time the defendant spent in prison for all his previous crimes. A person who has several convictions for minor crimes,may receive a maximum of one year’s imprisonment for a crime that provides for a sentence of several months. Gordon Miller had broken the law in the past, but he had not spent more than eight months in prison for any of his crimes. However, the judge recognized Miller as the subject of a felony and mistakenly condemned him in accordance with federal law.

North Carolina judges made similar catastrophic mistakes all the time until the United States Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals became interested in them in 2011. Realizing their mistake, representatives of the prosecution in the case of Miller, made an attempt to cancel the sentence, but the presiding judge refused to let them.

The Miller case is not one of a kind. In 2012, the United States Department of Justice concluded that at least 175 people were mistakenly sent to prison because of this oversight. More disturbing is the fact that USA Today revealed another 60 people who were convicted and the US Department of Justice knew about this, but was stubbornly silent, because they probably wanted them to remain behind bars for a long time.

five.Woman judge who forgot to release an innocent man from prison

Forgetfulness is not a vice, unless you are the judge who decides on the fate of people.

The judge of the Motril Criminal Court in Granada (Spain), Adeline Entren Corrillo, allowed an innocent person to languish a year in prison just because she forgot to release him.

In 2003, José Campo Maldonado was accused of committing a robbery. After failing to appear in court in 2005, he was arrested. At the conclusion of the trial, Judge Adeline Entrena Corrillo stated that José Campo Maldonado, despite ignoring the request to appear before the court, was not guilty of the robbery. However, 437 days after he was acquitted, Maldonado was still in prison, not even knowing that the judge who dropped the charges, forgot to submit the documents necessary for his release.

José Kampa Maldonado eventually asked the prison teacher to help him figure out how long he would have to remain behind bars. And here the whole truth came to light. Judge Adeline Entrena Corrillo and all those who participated in the Maldonado case seemed to have simply forgotten him.

As it turned out later, Maldonado was not the only “victim” of the forgetfulness of Judge Corrillo. In two other cases, the men of her fault spent a few months longer than the allotted time. Ultimately, Judge Adeline Entren Corrillo was deprived of her license because of her poor memory.

6. Authorities put an innocent father and son in jail in order to extract testimony from them

In 2012, the mother of six children, Maria Bolanos-Rivera, mysteriously disappeared. In the autumn of the same year, Oregon police arrested Benito Vazquez-Hernandez and his son Moises Vazquez-Santiago, who at the time were living in California. In total, they spent four years behind bars for a crime that they did not actually commit, and the police, oddly enough, knew about it. According to the authorities, another son of Vasquez-Hernandez, Eloy Vasquez-Santiago, was involved in the disappearance of Maria Bolanos-Rivera. However, they thought that Benito and Moises had information that could help them arrest Eloy. Fearing that the suspected father and brother would be reluctant to testify against Eloy, the court decided to hold them for some time in a prison cell.

According to Oregon law, witnesses whose testimony may be decisive in criminal cases are allowed to be held for an unlimited period of time. Moises Vazquez-Santiago spent 727 days in prison (almost two years), until he began to get over psychosis. After he began to walk an imaginary dog, watch TV, which could not be in the cell, and even spread his own excrement on the walls and the floor, they decided to release him. Moyes Vazquez-Santiago was diagnosed with schizophrenia and eventually allowed him to give video screenings.

Benito Vazquez-Hernandez did not lose his mind, like his son, but his position was no less deplorable. He did not know a word in English and did not understand the laws of the United States. In prison, a man spent 905 days (about 2.5 years); all this time he did not understand why he was here. He was given the opportunity to testify against his son before the start of the trial. The embarrassed and perplexed father took the opportunity and asked the judge why he was imprisoned if he was not guilty.

All his attempts to achieve justice before the trial were in vain.During the trial, Benito Vazquez-Hernandez denied the involvement of his son Eli in the disappearance of his mother and constantly repeated his innocence. Ultimately, he was released. He received compensation in the amount of 6000 dollars.

7. Clerical error allowed a man not to pay child support.

When a Texas resident, Clifford Hall, lost his job in 2013, he was unable to pay child support on time. After some time, he got a job at the telecommunications company AT & T and now he could again transfer money to support his child. However, Hall did not know that his new employer had mistakenly forgot to deduct child support from his salary. The man became suspicious about something wrong after the mother of his child sued him for not paying alimony.

Hall paid off the debt in the amount of $ 3,000 and thought that was all, but it was not there. The case against him was not closed, despite the availability of documents confirming that Hall’s employer simply forgot to deduct money from his salary. Because of the clerical error and the fact that Hall visited his son more often than usual, a loving father was sentenced to six months in prison.

The court eventually reversed its decision and reversed the sentence imposed on Hall.However, the case cost the man ten thousand dollars.

8. A man faces imprisonment because of a child whose father he is not

In the early 1990s, Alexander Carnell from Detroit, Michigan, heard the stunning news: he was wanted for non-payment of alimony. The man was shocked to hear this, because he, unlike the hero of the previous story, Clifford Hall, did not have children. Unfortunately, this rather substantial detail had little meaning in the eyes of the law.

The woman whom Alexander met in the 1980s turned out to be guilty of all this. In 1987, she gave birth to a child, the funds for which she did not have. Desperate and abandoned, she turned to the state for help, but in order to receive a financial allowance, she needed to write on the birth certificate the name of the father of the child. Without thinking about the consequences, the woman awarded Carnell Alexander the same honor.

Some time after this, Alexander was declared wanted for evasion from paying alimony. He did not receive any notifications from the authorities, as he was in prison for youthful negligence. But, for unknown reasons, the person who was entrusted with the transfer of the documents to Alexander, said that the alleged father had refused to sign them.By the time Alexander realized what was happening, it was already too late.

The authorities of the state of Michigan demanded from Alexander to pay off the arrears in the amount of several tens of thousands of dollars, despite the fact that he was not the father of the child. After much legal trouble, he was finally allowed to take a paternity test. But even after such convincing evidence and testimony of the woman who confirmed that he really did not have to father her child, the court did not regret Alexander. Authorities ordered him to pay compensation in the amount of 30 thousand dollars. Alexander, being shocked by such judicial injustice, refused to do so. Now he faces a prison sentence. His story once again proved that the law sometimes has nothing to do with justice.

9. A lawyer who was forced to defend himself, under the influence of drugs

In the 1990s, attorney Gary Dubin, appearing in the Court of Appeal, faced a great deal of grief and problems with the law. His son died of AIDS, and two years later he was put on trial for tax evasion. The tax administration of the United States of America mistakenly established that Gary Dubin owed the state $ 1.5 million.On top of that, Manuel Real, the judge who tried the Dubin case, refused to postpone the trial, which made it impossible for the lawyer to prepare himself to defend himself. Killed with grief and legal turmoil and deeply depressed, Gary Dubin was forced to go to the psychiatric ward to undergo treatment.

The most encouraging thing in this whole situation was that Dubin had documents refuting the charges of the tax administration, but, to his great regret, he could not get access to them because they were at his home. The unyielding judge Manuel Real, who would later be dismissed for his action, ordered that Dubin be pulled out of a mental hospital and presented to the court. Gary Dubin, being under the influence of antidepressants, could not connect two words during the court hearing. Without the necessary documents and preparation, he was unable to prove his innocence.

Judge Real, who lacked compassion, was adamant. He sentenced Dubin to 20 months of imprisonment of the vaults and wrote him a fine in the amount of 131,000 dollars.As a rule, conviction and prison term put an end to a lawyer’s career, but Dubin was lucky. During the evaluation of his case, it turned out that he was fined and was imprisoned for injustice. When all charges were dropped from him, he was allowed to resume his law practice, but the amount of the fine he paid was not returned.

10. An innocent man whose life was ruined by an accidental mistake.

Steve Talley, a twenty-year veteran of the financial services industry, worked for Transamerica Capital in Denver (Colorado) and led a comfortable, comfortable life, which in September 2014 abruptly went awry. Ultimately, Talley lost his job, his home, and turned into a hopeless person. A man has come to such a life through no fault of his own, he just turned out to be very similar to a bank robber.

The nightmare in Steve Talley's life began on September 15, 2014, when police officers arrested him and put him in a Denver prison. Talley was shocked when he learned that he was accused of armed assault and robbing a bank. As evidence of his guilt, the police provided videotapes from surveillance cameras and testimony from witnesses, a bank teller and a security guard, who were seen by a real criminal.Oddly enough, but his ex-wife Tally and his roommate also confirmed that he was the one on the videos and photos provided by the police. However, there was one major inconsistency in this case: Steve Talley was at work at the time the bank was robbed, and he could easily prove it.

In the office where Talley worked, all employees were allowed only with special permits. The records showed that he was at work all day, so he could not commit the crime he was accused of. Moreover, Transamerica Capital had copies of Talley's fingerprints, which police officers checked against the crime database, but found nothing.

For unknown reasons, the police did not consider the presence of an alibi when investigating the case of Steve Talley. But the worst thing is that the lawyer Talley obtained evidence of the presence of his client at work in the office on the day of the robbery only two months after he was behind bars. Subsequently, the charges with Talley were dropped, but this did not save his badly damaged reputation. After his release, Steve Talley was never able to find work in the area to which he dedicated two decades of his life. The world around him collapsed.

Related news

  • Private clinics of the Luhansk region: a selection of sites
  • The strongest prayer for children is prayer with faith
  • Gucci - a variety of flavors that emphasize individuality
  • What is cytomegalovirus and how is it dangerous?
  • Additional services for sites
  • Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws

    Trap laws