The best examples of political cartoons

The best examples of political cartoons

Laugh at the power, if it was not too dangerous, was loved almost always and almost everywhere, but the British were the most successful. It was on the British Isles that the phenomenon of political caricature originated. Innovation, which appeared on the pages of English newspapers in the second half of the XVIII century, took root so much that in a hundred years the cartoonist became almost the most important person in the editorial.

Cult "Punch"

Appeared in 1841, the weekly magazine of humor and satire "Punch" existed until the beginning of the XXI century and during this time became the standard of political caricature. The magazine’s huge circulation ran like hot cakes, especially during major political changes. For example, it was during the First World War.

The very beginning of the war - Germany tears off the mask of the world and shows its true face, taking out a sword from under its cloak.1

Turkish Sultan Mehmed V tries on the armor of the great Kaiser, which turns out to be too large for him.2

German Kaiser Wilhelm II takes care of replenishing the treasury during the period of hostilities.3

Kaiser - the unchanging character of British caricatures - dances his last dance.4

He is in the arms of a not very peace-loving beast. It is not difficult to guess that the enraged bear was and remains the image symbolizing Russia. In general, during the war, the British opinion about Russia changed radically: from the barbarians, the Russians turned into a powerful force in the European theater of operations. The Russian bear has become fond of the cartoonists of “Punch” so much that he began to wander from one picture to another.5

Here a teddy bear in an elegant hat comes out of his hiding place when the two-headed Austrian eagle tries to grab Serbia.6

Here, a much more ominously drawn beast throws off the shackles of German influence.7

Until the middle of 1917, the Bolsheviks did not figure in caricatures, but after their appearance, the attitude towards Russia again changed to one hundred eighty degrees.8

No less ingeniously the editorial staff of the journal reacted to political events in the future. So, according to the artists of "Punch", the signing of the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact looked like.9

10Father of the Soviet cartoon Boris Efimov

Boris Yefimov (real surname Fridland) was a brother of the famous publicist Mikhail Koltsov. From the age of 18, Boris began to paint caricatures, and at 20 he already worked as a cartoonist. From the cartoons of Efimov, making fun of the leaders of Nazi Germany, Adolf Hitler nervously gnashed his teeth. Boris Efimov himself fell into the Guinness Book of Records as the oldest cartoonist in the world: on his 105th birthday, he read from memory a huge ballad by Twardowski, and in 107 years he became the main artist of the Izvestia newspaper.

Caricature "Brain stuffing. Mass education of Hitler's thugs ". So Boris Efimov beats Hitler’s saying that “young people should be like young wild animals.”11

"The giant of Aryan thought" - so Efimov ridicules the growth of the Reichminster of propaganda of Dr. Goebbels.12

“The best of the best” - Efimov, on the example of the German leaders, demonstrates their inconsistency between the theory of “pure race”.13

Here, the artist mocks the fact that in his youth, Adolf Hitler dreamed of becoming an architect.14

Not very often, but still there were instructive images for Soviet commanders.15

Less successful examples of Soviet cartoons

Attempts to ridicule the leaders of the USSR almost always, if only the author could be found, ended the same way.

Valery Mezhlauk, the People's Commissar of Heavy Industry and part-time author of this image, was soon sentenced to death.16

Exactly the same fate befell the editor-in-chief of Pravda, Nikolai Bukharin, who, before the press, allowed his cartoon to Comrade Stalin. The last joke, apparently, did not understand.17

American caricature father Thomas Nast

Nast gained fame during the Civil War. Lincoln himself noted that no one attracted more recruits under the banners of the northern states than Nast with his works. Nastia was threatened by the most corrupt politician in US history, William Tweed, who even tried to appoint an award for the head of the artist-accuser. In general, Nast supported American Indians and Chinese immigrants in his political drawings and advocated a ban on slavery.

The caricature of Nasta shows crocodiles depicting priests attacking American families.

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  • The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons

    The best examples of political cartoons