Takomsky Bridge (on the theme of the Volgograd Bridge)

Takomsky Bridge (on the theme of the Volgograd Bridge)

The predecessor of this bridge in the United States collapsed as a result of the same phenomenon that happened with Volgograd.
under the cut description and video
Tacom Bridge, or Tacoma-Narrows Bridge - a suspension bridge in the United States, in Washington State, built across the Tacoma-Narrows Strait (part of the Puget Sound Bay).
The original version of the bridge was designed by Leon Moiseiseff and opened to traffic on July 1, 1940. Even during the construction, the builders gave him the nickname “Galloping Gertie” (eng. Galloping Gertie) due to the fact that his roadbed was swinging heavily in windy weather (due to the low height of the stiffening beam).
The main characteristics of the bridge:
total length - 1810 m;
length of the central span - 854 m;
width - 11.9 m;
diameter of the main (supporting) cables - 438 mm;
sag (the difference between the height of the cable at the pylons and the height at the point of its greatest sag) - 70.7 m;
pylons - steel on concrete bulls;
stiffness beam height - 2.44 m.
On November 7, 1940 at 11:00 local time, an accident occurred at a wind speed of about 18 m / s, which led to the destruction of the central span of the bridge.
The destruction process was filmed on a Kodachrome 16 mm color film. Based on the shooting, the documentary film “The Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse” (1940) was created, which allowed later to study in detail the process of destruction.
The accident of the bridge left a significant mark in the history of science and technology. The destruction of the bridge has contributed to research in the field of aerodynamics and aeroelasticity of structures and changes in the design of all large-span bridges in the world since the 1940s. In many textbooks, the cause of an accident is the phenomenon of forced mechanical resonance, when the external frequency of the wind flow coincides with the internal frequency of oscillations of the bridge structures. However, the true cause was aeroelastic flutter (dynamic torsional vibrations) due to underreporting of wind loads during the design of the structure.
The destruction process is described as follows:
An open suspension of the central span caused sagging of side spans and inclination of the pylons.Strong vertical and torsional vibrations of the bridge resulted from excessive flexibility of the structure and relatively small ability of the bridge to absorb dynamic forces ... The bridge was designed and correctly designed for static loads, including wind, but the aerodynamic load was not taken into account. Torsional vibrations have arisen as a result of the wind acting on the roadway near the horizontal axis parallel to the longitudinal axis of the bridge. Torsional vibrations were amplified by vertical vibrations of the cables. Lowering the cable from one side of the bridge and raising it from the other caused a slope of the carriageway and generated torsional vibrations.
Dismantling of the pylons and side spans was started shortly after the accident and lasted until May 1943. During the construction of the new bridge, anchoring abutments, bulls (bases) of the pylons and some other components of the old bridge were used. The fully restored bridge (eng. Westbound Bridge) was opened on October 14, 1950 and became the third longest suspension bridge in the world at that time (the total length is 1822 m, the length of the central span is 853 m [5]). For additional stability and reduction of aerodynamic loads, open trusses, stiffening racks, were introduced into the design of the new bridge.expansion joints and vibration damping systems. The capacity of the bridge is 60 thousand cars per day.
In 2002-2007, to increase the capacity of the highway, another bridge was erected near the old one (eng.

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  • Takomsky Bridge (on the theme of the Volgograd Bridge)

    Takomsky Bridge (on the theme of the Volgograd Bridge)

    Takomsky Bridge (on the theme of the Volgograd Bridge)

    Takomsky Bridge (on the theme of the Volgograd Bridge)

    Takomsky Bridge (on the theme of the Volgograd Bridge)

    Takomsky Bridge (on the theme of the Volgograd Bridge)

    Takomsky Bridge (on the theme of the Volgograd Bridge)

    Takomsky Bridge (on the theme of the Volgograd Bridge)

    Takomsky Bridge (on the theme of the Volgograd Bridge)

    Takomsky Bridge (on the theme of the Volgograd Bridge)

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