Miss Marple. Little sly old lady

Miss Marple. Little sly old lady.

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Jane Marple, known asMiss Marple, appears in 12 novels and 20 stories of Agatha Christie. Miss Marple is an old maid from the village of St. Mary-Mead who investigates crimes as an amateur detective. Together with Hercule Poirot, she is one of Christie's favorite and long-lived images.
Miss Marple first appears in the story 'The Evening Club' Tuesday 'of 1926, which later became the first chapter of the book' Thirteen Mysterious Cases' of 1932. To create the image of Miss Marple, Christie borrowed the features of her “kindly grandmother, always expecting trouble from everyone and everything.” However, it is not known for certain why the writer dwelled on the version of the name 'Marple'. While working on her heroine, Christie saw in her a certain old lady, akin to those intimate friends of her grandmother from Ealing, whom Christie constantly met in her childhood.


 

Michael Morton, who staged Christie's The Killing of Roger Ackroyd on stage, replaced the age of one of the heroines, the old maid Caroline Sheppard (Caroline Sheppard), making her a young woman.It so saddened Christie that she firmly decided that Miss Marple would be 'born' elderly.
In the 1930's Murder in the Vicar's House, the character of Miss Marple is markedly different from what Christy represents in the future. The early 'version' of the old woman is a cheerful gossip hunter, on the whole not a very pleasant woman. Residents of St. Mary-Mead respect her, but they get tired of her excessive curiosity, as well as the fact that she constantly expects the worst from everyone. In later works, Miss Marple becomes kinder and more modern.
Miss Marple was never married and had no close relatives. Her nephew, 'famous author' Raymond West, married to an artist named Joan, always overestimates himself and underestimates his aunt's mental abilities. Miss Marple also has Mabel's niece, the widow of the mysterious deceased Jeffrey Danama.
Miss Marple reveals tangled crimes due to her unrivaled insight. Usually we are talking about murders that happen somewhere nearby, and an elderly detective begins to investigate at will. Someone very much doubts her analytical skills, sometimes listening to her incoherent and confused speech.But in fact, Miss Marple is simply indispensable in the case when the police are too tough to solve strange riddles and unusual cases. An innocent old woman, without arousing suspicion, is able to ask sometimes delicate questions, reveal details about the family life of the suspects, and even concern herself with money questions. All this is perceived as nothing more than an old woman's curiosity, behind which there is in fact a subtle calculation.
Having gathered a huge knowledge base about the negative aspects of human nature, Miss Marple always comes to a deeper understanding of the true nature of the crime. She looks very fragile, tender and old woman, but she is not afraid of either the dead or the living. Among other things, the detective has a remarkable ability to catch random comments of eyewitnesses or defendants in the case and associate with the rest of the evidence. In her opinion, all types of people are the same, therefore, if you determine the type, you can almost accurately build conclusions about a person. Starting from this reasoning, Miss Marple, while investigating the current crime, is always looking for a case in the history of the village of St. Mary Mead, or any person who can make parallels between the past and the present.
Miss Marple never worked and was always financially independent. She is not delighted with the aristocracy or the local nobility, but in this society she feels completely her own. She herself calls herself a 'noble' woman who has received a good upbringing and education. It is known that Miss Marple attended art courses that examined human anatomy through the study of human corpses. In the novel 'With the help of mirrors' ('They Do It with Mirrors') of 1952, it is said that Miss Marple grew up next to the cathedral and studied at the Italian boarding house of noble maidens.
The last time Miss Marple appears in the novel 'Sleeping Murder' ('Sleeping Murder'). In fact, Christie wrote it back in 1940 and hid it in a bank safe, not wanting to put an end to the career of a brilliant old woman. The novel was published only in 1976, after the death of the writer.
On television, Miss Marple played a whole galaxy of actresses, but most successfully portrayed her Joan Hickson.

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  • Miss Marple. Little sly old lady

    Miss Marple. Little sly old lady

    Miss Marple. Little sly old lady

    Miss Marple. Little sly old lady

    Miss Marple. Little sly old lady

    Miss Marple. Little sly old lady

    Miss Marple. Little sly old lady

    Miss Marple. Little sly old lady

    Miss Marple. Little sly old lady

    Miss Marple. Little sly old lady

    Miss Marple. Little sly old lady

    Miss Marple. Little sly old lady

    Miss Marple. Little sly old lady

    Miss Marple. Little sly old lady

    Miss Marple. Little sly old lady

    Miss Marple. Little sly old lady

    Miss Marple. Little sly old lady

    Miss Marple. Little sly old lady

    Miss Marple. Little sly old lady

    Miss Marple. Little sly old lady