Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

"Memories" of children who in the past life were Buddhist monks

Dr. Erlendur Haraldson, Professor Emeritus at the University of Iceland (Reykjavik), studied a number of phenomena associated with the recollections of children’s “past lives”. On several occasions, the boys claimed that in their past earthly incarnations they were Buddhist monks. Often, such memories were immediately recorded (which is important, as they could be distorted over time) and later compared with real stories of deceased monks.

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Cases in which the details of the monk’s life, as told by the children, were confirmed by real documents or eyewitness testimonies, the researchers call “open cases”. Accordingly, those cases where the details cannot be confirmed, or they are too vague, the researchers consider "unsolved cases."

Dr. Haraldson became interested in the revealed affairs of children who “recalled” how they were Buddhist monks.“These cases seem to me particularly curious about the behavioral characteristics of children. Each of the children demonstrated acceptable or even exemplary behavior for the monk, ”he wrote in his scientific report published in the journal Society for Psychical Research.

Such uncharacteristic behavior for ordinary children was not at all pleasing to the parents - on the contrary, it was alarming and perplexing.

The case of Duminda Bandara Ratnayaka

Duminda Bandara Ratnayaka was born in 1984 in the mountain village of Sri Lanka. When the boy was three years old, he suddenly began to “remember” the details of “his” life, which he could not invent or learn from anyone. Details were as follows:

He was the senior monk in the Asgiriya temple, which is located 25 km from the real place of residence of Duminda.

One day he felt severe pain in his chest and fell. And he died. Telling this episode, the boy used the word "apavatvuna", which is used only in the case when it comes to the death of the monks.

He had a red car. He had disciples - younger monks. He had an elephant.

He often visited the temple of Malvatta, and knew the local monks well.

In Asghiriya, he had a purse and a radio, which he wanted to pick up. Mother Duminda for a long time did not dare to tell this detail to someone - after all, it is well known that monks should not be attached to things.

The boy did not want to play with other children at all and he kept saying that he was going to become a monk. He knew the Buddhist chants in the ancient language of Sinhalese Buddhism, which only monks study. He imitated the monks in the manner of dressing, visited the temple and regularly made flower offerings, as it should be in Buddhism.

In general, the boy’s behavior was not childish at all - he was always calm and focused, deep in himself and full of dignity. Duminda even forbade the mother to touch his hands - and in Buddhism, women really cannot touch the hands of a monk.

Haraldson talked with a local monk and he said that the parents could not teach the boy all these tricks.

Do the details given by the child correspond to the details of the life of a real monk?

The description of Duminda really coincides with the details of the life of a monk named Mahanayak Gunnepan. He died of a heart attack. During the life went by red car.I read sermons. It is known that a senior student of Gunnepana somehow caught an elephant and took him to his native village of Gunnepana, which the monk often visited. Gunnepana loved this elephant, who died, by the way, shortly before the death of the monk himself. Perhaps this was the very "own elephant." The snag came from the radio - it was not a monk. But since there were no other candidates suitable for the boy’s description, Haraldson continued his search and found out that the monk had his own gramophone. It is possible that Gunnepan (who loved music, this is a fact) for some reason called the gramophone “radio”. Everyone who knew Gunnepana spoke of him as a good monk who strictly followed all Buddhist rules. Here, too, everything came together with the child's behavior.

Haraldson is convinced that the boy could not find out such details from the people around him. Theoretically, he could learn the chants on the local radio - they are really broadcast early in the morning. But this is extremely unlikely.

The case of Hamage Ruvan Taranga Perera

Hamage Ruvan Tkharanga Perera was born in August 1987 in Sri Lanka. He was only two years old when he suddenly started talking about his past life in the Pitumpka Monastery.Hamag's parents did not even hear about such a monastery, but they made inquiries and it turned out that a monastery with such a name really exists, and is located 32 kilometers south of where they live.

The boy described the temple of the monastery - in particular, spoke about the clay statue of a monkey. Images of monkeys are not quite common in Buddhist temples, however, this detail has been confirmed.

Hamage himself sat in the lotus position - no one taught him that. He knew how to wear a monk's vestment. In the evenings, the boy refused to eat, because the monks are not supposed to eat food after noon. In addition, the baby said his mother that he would not sleep with her, because the monks can not sleep with women. In the evenings, he arranged a ceremony with reading mantras and demanded that his family join him. Gamage very seriously scolded his own father when he brought home a bottle of liquor.

Meanwhile, even when he was reprimanding his relatives for “unworthy” behavior, he thought, he remained imperturbable and never angry.

Among his peers, Hamage quickly gained great prestige and taught them the proper performance of religious rites.Like Duminda, he knew Buddhist chants in the ancient language, which he could theoretically (but extremely unlikely) learn by listening to the radio.

At first, the parents of Hamaga did not attach great importance to their son. Dr. Haraldson learned his story from a local journalist, who, in turn, was told by a boy’s neighbor.

Hamage was not interested in children's games. Everywhere he carried with him a small figure of the Buddha, painted plots from the life of the Buddha, and preferred to wear clothes that resemble monastic.

Later, the parents still heeded the pleas of his son and took him to the temple Pitumpke. He conducted a tour for them, showed a clay monkey, saying that it was installed “not in the right way”. Many inhabitants of the monastery recognized in the boy the reincarnation of the former abbot Ganihigama Pannasekhara (1902-1986).

In a conversation with the monks, several more interesting details emerged:

The abbot of Pannasekhar was a vegetarian (which is not very characteristic of Sri Lanka), and he also preferred vegetable food. The fact that Pannasekhara became the abbot, agrees with the leadership qualities of the boy and the desire to conduct religious ceremonies.Pannasekhara died in January 1986, that is, 17 months before the birth of Hamage. Finally, Gamage was raised in a family far from religion.

However, there is one snag: the boy did not recognize people close to Pannasekhar, which allowed skeptics to remain unconvinced.

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  • Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life

    Memories of children who were Buddhist monks in a past life