Jewish refugees

Jewish refugees

August 14, 2018

By the time of the end of the Second World War, more than 200 thousand Jews were in the refugee camps in Europe.

Unlike the vast majority of foreigners who were in Germany, Austria and Italy after the war, they sought to return home as soon as possible (by August 1945 about five million of them had repatriated, and by the end of the year another million) There was virtually no place for the surviving Jews to return to - the terrible experience they experienced turned them away from the pre-war countries of residence, where neighbors often participated in the destruction of their families and where there was no trace of the Jewish communities.

The number of inhabitants of displaced persons camps also increased significantly due to the influx of Jews who did not find another refuge, who fought in partisan units and the underground against the Nazis or hid on forged “Aryan” documents.

Former prisoners of Buchenwald in Haifa

Only the creation in 1948 of the State of Israel really provided a solution to the problem of Jewish displaced persons.The Jewish state not only immediately lifted all restrictions on the entry of Jews into the country, but also declared it an inalienable right. As early as January 1949, 100 thousand people arrived in Israel, and in the first year of the state’s existence 203 thousand people, mostly from internment camps in Cyprus and camps for displaced persons in Germany, Austria and Italy. The report of the special subcommittee on displaced persons of the legal commission of the House of Representatives of the United States Congress of January 20, 1950 noted that Israel does not select immigrants according to professional, age, medical and other criteria, but opens wide the doors of the new state to all Jews, including who in many ways would be unacceptable for any other country. The arrival of most Jewish displaced persons from Europe by the beginning of 1950 to Israel from Europe and the emigration of the rest mainly to the USA and Canada removed the problem of displaced persons from the agenda. Of the four camps still remaining in Germany for Jewish displaced persons, three were closed in 1951, and the last in 1953.

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  • Jewish refugees

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    Jewish refugees

    Jewish refugees

    Jewish refugees

    Jewish refugees

    Jewish refugees

    Jewish refugees

    Jewish refugees