In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity.

In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity. There are not many stories about the great Greek heroes who quietly left this world in a dream. At least, they are outnumbered by the stories about people who died under the wheels of ruthless chariots.

Ancient Greece was a country that was famous for strange deaths. Perhaps this was due to the fact that the ancient Greeks tried things that others didn’t have the courage to do, or they just didn’t want to spoil history with dry facts. We will never be able to find out how everything actually happened, however, judging by the records left by ancient Greek historians, Greece at its heyday was a country where an epidemic of ridiculous deaths reigned.

1. Bupal committed suicide because of insult

Hipponact was a poet, or at least the ancient Greeks called him that because of the lack of a more suitable word. He did not write about fragrant flowers or beautiful dragonflies. In his poems it was often possible to find references to human waste or fellatio.

He was also one of the ugliest men in history, so it is not surprising that when he made a marriage proposal to her lover, she rejected him. Heartbroken, Hipponact decided to write a series of unflattering and offensive poems about the father of his heart, Bupala, who, in turn, could not bear the blow and hanged himself.

Most of the insults that Hipponact used in works devoted to Bupala were lost in time, but some fragments still survived to our days. So, for example, one of the lines of the poem about Bupal says: "The wicked villain who loved to pop into the actinia of his sleeping mother." In another work, Hipponacte claimed that Bupal was engaged in oral sex with his own mother. In the third, he called him a "bastard."

2. Chrysippus died of laughing at his own joke

Chrysippus was one of the leading Stoic philosophers, whom the Greeks called "super-high-dimensional man," so it is not at all surprising that he died of laughter at his own joke.

Chrysippus was an incredibly fruitful philosopher who had a perverse sense of humor. In all his life he has written 705 books,most of which have not reached our days. According to historians, his most famous work was dedicated to the goddess Juno, who was a prostitute. According to the Greeks, "it was impossible to talk about it without using foul language in my speech."

Chrysippus met his end when he saw a drunken donkey trying to eat figs. The philosopher decided that it was the funniest sight he had ever seen in his life. Chrysippus burst into wild laughter, which, oddly enough, led him to death.

3. Draco suffocated under the weight of gifts

The man, whose harsh laws led to the emergence of the concept of "draconian", died in a rather strange way. Draco was one of those who believed that cabbage theft should be punished with death. Despite this, he was so loved by everyone that he was literally crushed by the weight of his own popularity.

Legend has it that Draco was at the theater in Aegina when supporters decided to show him how much they loved him. They began to throw at him their hats and other items of clothing. (The ancient Greeks expressed gratitude to a person by removing their clothes and throwing them into them.)

Draco's fans had drifted a little: he suffocated under the weight of hundreds of tunics that were thrown in his direction.

4. Heraclitus smeared himself with manure and was eaten by dogs.

The death of the philosopher Heraclitus seems a bit strange, but there is a good reason why he smeared himself with manure and was torn up by hungry dogs. Albeit a bad reason, but still a reason.

Heraclitus suffered from edema; Doctors told him that his illness was incurable, but he believed that he could outwit them all. Heraclitus told them: "Emptying the intestines, I can take away moisture." The doctors had no idea what he meant by the phrase “wipe off moisture”. For Heraclitus, this meant: "I am going to smear my body with cow dung." It is not entirely clear why the philosopher thought that cow dung would help him get rid of the disease, or for whatever reason, he ignored the advice of doctors who told him otherwise. Whatever it was, Heraclitus spent the whole day, slept in the sun in cow dung. When he woke up, he realized that he could not move because the manure had hardened. While he was trying to find a way out of this situation, wild dogs came running and ate him alive.

5. Thucydides dies "in short"

The works of Thucydides are considered the most reliable and reliable sources related to the history of ancient Greece. Thucydides was one of the few who did not like to “season” their stories with rumors and myths. Unfortunately, the end of his life was sad: he was killed at the moment when he was writing a story for posterity.

Thucydides took part in the Peloponnesian War, however he was expelled from Greece for his inability to protect the city of Amphipolis. After many years he was allowed to return to his native land. The Greeks sent him a message, and the delighted Thucydides collected his things and immediately set off to see his homeland again. And then he was killed. We don’t know the details, except for being punished on the way home. When this happened, he just wrote a sentence in his book, which he was not destined to finish.

6. Pierre died because an elderly woman threw tiles on his head

The legendary Greek commander Pierre was not their one who stood aside while his people were fighting on the battlefield. He always fought in the forefront, risking his own life. However, he was not destined to die in battle the hero's brave death.

When Pierre led his army through the streets of Argos, he clashed in a duel with a young warrior, whose mother, like all citizens, unable to hold a weapon, was sitting on the roof of the house at that time. The elderly woman, seeing that her son was in mortal danger, tore the tiles off the roof and threw it on Pyrrha’s head. The commander fell from his horse. He was still alive, but at that moment another enemy soldier ran up to him and beheaded him with his sword.

7. Filit Kossky died from malnutrition and insomnia, correcting other people's mistakes

Filit Kossky was born at the wrong time. In the era of Internet commentators, he would have been king, but in Ancient Greece he was no more than a hero of an instructive story.

Filit Kossky was engaged in correcting the mistakes of other people. Every time someone used an inappropriate word or made a logical mistake in his speech, he recorded this case on paper and gave detailed explanations of how it should be correct. According to legend, Philit Kossky was so carried away by this that he even forgot about food and rest. Ultimately, he died from malnutrition and insomnia, trying to correct the mistakes of other people.The following inscription was engraved on its tombstone: “A stranger, my name is Filit Kossky. I was killed by false arguments and troubles that took me all the time. ”

8. Arrihion became the first athlete to win the Olympics, being dead

Arrihion was a pankratiast. Pankration in ancient Greece was called the kind of martial arts, which occupied one of the important places in the Olympics.

Arrihion twice became the Olympic champion in pankration. The last victory he won, being already dead. When Arrahion participated in the decisive match, the enemy pressed him to the ground with his feet and, seizing his hands by the throat, began to choke. Arrihion wanted to give up, but the coach did not allow him to do it. He shouted: "What an honor - to fight to the last and die at the Olympics!"

These words, apparently, gave Arrihion strength, and he continued the fight. Pankraiasta managed to free himself from the capture of the enemy and turn out his ankle joint. Because of the unbearable pain he gave up. In a second, Archrihion was already dead. He went down in history as the first athlete who won his victory at the Olympics, already dead.

9.Aeschyl died after an eagle dropped a tortoise on his head

Aeschylus was a great ancient Greek playwright. He is considered the father of the European tragedy. However, the end of the life of Aeschylus was no less tragic than his own works.

The oracle predicted Aeschylus that he would die from a blow from heaven. The playwright thought he would be killed by lightning, or he would die under the rubble of his destroyed house. He did not even suspect that the turtle would be the cause of his death.

On that fateful day, Aeschylus was on the island of Sicily. He went about his business when the eagle, flying over him, threw a tortoise on his head, taking his brilliant bald spot by a stone. Such was the sad end of the life of the great playwright.

10. Empedocles rushed into the mouth of a volcano to gain immortality.

Diogenes wrote: "He [Empedocles] is sometimes very boastful." Well, perhaps Empedocles was really arrogant after he cured a woman whom all doctors considered hopeless. In his opinion, this was clear evidence that he was a god.

He gathered a group of 80 people and climbed with them to the top of the volcano, where he declared himself immortal and rushed straight into the mouth.After that, they began to consider him not only boastful, but also insane. However, he already did not care.

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  • In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity

    In ancient Greece, rarely who died with dignity